Skip to main content

How can we help you?

  • Last updated: 30-06-2020

COVID-19 has already had a material impact on companies and their business. Flights have been cancelled, restaurants are closed, and people are no longer using public transport. The European Commission has recognised the economic consequences of the pandemic and the measures being taken to contain it and indicated that it will use all tools at its disposal to make sure that "the European economy weathers this storm".

As the situation develops, the European Commission and the Dutch government are continually assessing, adding to or amending State Aid measures, as necessary. Our COVID-19 State Aid Tracker provides you with the latest updates on State Aid measures as they become available.
 
Please do not hesitate to contact us should you have any questions regarding any of these developments.

Go to the oldest update

29 June
Following the approval by the European Commission of the scheme, SME entrepreneurs who are directly affected by the various Cabinet measures to contain the coronavirus can apply for the Tegemoetkoming Vaste Lasten MKB (TVL) from Tuesday 30 June. Eligible businesses receive a tax-free allowance from the Ministry of Economic Affairs to cover their fixed costs. Depending on the size of the company, the level of fixed costs and the drop in turnover (at least 30%), the SME will receive an allowance of up to €50,000, to be used to cover its fixed costs for the next four months. Businesses eligible to receive TOGS assistance also qualify for this new scheme.


29 June
The European Commission has adopted a third amendment to extend the scope of the State aid Temporary Framework adopted on 19 March 2020 to support the economy in the context of the coronavirus outbreak. The Temporary Framework was first amended on 3 April 2020 to increase possibilities for public support to research, testing and production of products relevant to fight the coronavirus outbreak, to protect jobs and to further support the economy. On 8 May 2020, the Commission adopted a second amendment extending the scope of the Temporary Framework to recapitalisation and subordinated debt measures. The new amendment extends the Temporary Framework to enable Member States to provide public support under the Temporary Framework to all micro and small companies, even if they were already in financial difficulty on 31 December 2019.

This will apply, unless such companies are in insolvency proceedings, have received rescue aid that has not been repaid, or are subject to a restructuring plan under State aid rules. Given their limited size and involvement in cross-border transactions, temporary State aid to micro and small companies is less likely to distort competition in the Internal Market than State aid to larger companies.

This amendment also effectively increases the possibilities to support start-up companies, the vast majority of which fall within the micro and small companies cluster, especially innovative ones which may be loss-making in their high-growth phase, which are crucial for the economic recovery of the Union.


27 June
The ‘Global Goal: Unite for our Future' pledging summit organised by the European Commission and Global Citizen mobilised €6.15 billion in additional funding to help develop and ensure equitable access to coronavirus vaccines, tests and treatments. The money raised will also support economic recovery in the world's most fragile regions and communities.

This amount includes a €4.9 billion pledge by the European Investment Bank, in partnership with the European Commission, and €485 million committed by EU Member States. This brings total pledges under the Coronavirus Global Response pledging marathon, launched by European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen on 4 May, to €15.9 billion.


26 June
The European Commission has approved the Dutch Tegemoetkoming Vaste Lasten MKB (TVL) scheme, with an estimated budget of €1.4 billion, to support small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) affected by the coronavirus outbreak. The scheme was announced by the Dutch government on 28 May.


25 June
The Dutch cabinet has published the new NOW scheme containing the conditions of this subsidy from the second emergency package. Employers can apply for the NOW 2.0 from 6 July forward. For further details please see our article on NOW 2.0.


18 June
Since June 18, European Union countries can apply for additional funding to transport essential goods, medical teams and patients affected by the coronavirus. This funding can be applied for via the Emergency Support Instrument, which comes in addition to the support that is already available to the countries via the EU Civil Protection Mechanism and deliveries of protective equipment through rescEU. An amount of EUR 220 million has been made available.


12 June
On 12 June, the European Commission sent to the Member States a draft proposal to further extend the Temporary Framework. Prior to this proposal, the Temporary Framework has already been amended twice (3 April and 8 May 2020). 
The Commission is now proposing to further extend the scope for the third time by enabling Member States:

  1. to support certain micro and small enterprises, including start-ups that were already in difficulty before 31 December 2019, and 
  2. to provide incentives for private investors to participate in coronavirus-related recapitalisation measures.

This amendment will effectively increase the possibilities to support start-up companies, especially innovative ones which may be loss-making in their high-growth phase, which are crucial for the economic recovery of the Union.
Furthermore, the Commission also proposes to adapt the conditions for recapitalisation measures under the Temporary Framework for those cases when private investors contribute to the capital increase of companies together with the State. First, the proposed changes would allow enterprises with an existing State shareholding to raise capital similar to private enterprises, whilst maintaining the same safeguards to preserve effective competition in the Single Market. Second, the proposed changes would encourage capital injections with significant private participation also in private companies, limiting the need for State aid and the risk of competition distortions.


28 May
The Dutch government has amended the Emergency Package for Jobs and the Economy 2.0 announced on 20 May, by extending it until 1 October. This extension is applicable to many of the existing measures, such as the NOW, the TOZO and several tax measures.
Furthermore, the additional injection of funding to the COL announced on 20 May is increased to EUR 200 million, up from EUR 150 million.
The Dutch government has also announced a new measure assisting SME's in covering their fixed costs (Tegemoetkoming Vaste Lasten MKB, TVL). SMEs active in the hospitality, recreation, events, fun fairs, music venues and theatre sectors, amongst others, are eligible to receive a tax-free allowance from the Ministry of Economic Affairs to cover their fixed costs. Depending on the size of the company, the level of fixed costs and the drop in turnover (at least 30%), the SME will receive an allowance of up to €50,000, to be used to cover its fixed costs for the next four months. Businesses eligible to receive TOGS assistance also qualify for this new scheme.


28 May
The European Commission has approved the Dutch €713 million Small Credits Corona scheme (Klein Krediet Corona or KKC). The support will take the form of guarantees on loans with a nominal loan amount between €10,000 and €50,000. The State guarantee will cover 95% of the loan. The scheme aims at providing liquidity to SMEs affected by the coronavirus outbreak, thus enabling them to continue their activities, start investments and maintain employment. The measure is expected to support 30,000 enterprises. A bridge-loan with a guarantee under the KKC scheme can be applied for through the company's financier. All financiers accredited to grant BMKB-C loans are automatically also accredited to grant KKC loans. The KKC scheme was announced by the Dutch government on 8 May.


25 May
The European Commission has approved, under EU State aid rules, the Dutch guarantee scheme to support the trade credit insurance market in face of the coronavirus outbreak. This guarantee scheme was announced by the Dutch government on 7 April. Trade credit insurance protects companies supplying goods and services against the risk of nonpayment by their clients. Given the economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak, the risk of insurers not being willing to issue this insurance has become higher. The Dutch scheme ensures that trade credit insurance continues to be available to all companies, avoiding the need for buyers of goods or services to pay in advance, therefore reducing their immediate liquidity needs. The Commission found that the scheme notified by the Netherlands is compatible with the principles set out in the EU Treaty and is well targeted to remedy a serious disturbance to the Dutch economy. In particular, (i) the trade credit insurers have committed to the Netherlands to maintain their current level of protection in spite of the economic difficulties faced by companies due to the coronavirus outbreak; (ii) the guarantee is limited to only cover trade credit originated until the end of this year; (iii) the scheme is open to all credit insurers in the Netherlands; (iv) the guarantee mechanism ensures risk sharing between the insurers and the State, up to a volume of €1 billion, and provides an additional safety-net to cover up to €12 billion in total if required, and (v) the guarantee fee provides a sufficient remuneration for the Dutch State.


20 May
The Dutch government has updated its Emergency Package for Jobs and the Economy. On 20 May the cabinet introduced the Emergency Package 2.0, for which an additional EUR 13 billion has been budgeted. The updated package touches on the following measures:

  • New measure: financial assistance to SMEs for fixed expenses - SMEs active in the hospitality, recreation, events, fun fairs, music venues and theatre sectors, amongst others, are eligible to receive - in addition to financial assistance with wage costs (NOW) - a tax-free allowance from the Ministry of Economic Affairs to cover their fixed costs. Depending on the size of the company, the level of fixed costs and the drop in turnover (at least 30%), the SME will receive an allowance of up to EUR 50,000, to be used to cover its fixed costs for the next four months. EUR 1,4 billion has been made available for this scheme. Businesses eligible to receive TOGS assistance also qualify for this new scheme.
  • Extension of and changes to the Emergency Bridge Fund for Employment (NOW) - The Emergency Bridge Fund for Employment will remain available to businesses expecting at least a 20% drop in revenue for the months of June, July and August. The fixed surcharge will be increased from 30% to 40%. In this way, NOW contributes to costs other than wage costs. The reference month for the wage bill under NOW 2.0 is March 2020. A company that makes use of NOW is not allowed to distribute profits to shareholders, pay bonuses to the board or management, or buy back its own shares in 2020. For further details please see our article on NOW 2.0
  • Extension of tax measures - The period during which affected businesses can apply for tax deferrals has been extended until 1 September 2020. Penalties for late payment will not be enforced during this period. The late payment interest rate and the recovery interest rate for taxes have been reduced to 0.01% until 1 October 2020. Other tax measures, such as a relaxation of the hours requirement for self-employed persons and the mortgage holiday, will also be extended until 1 September 2020.
  • Coronavirus-related financing options (BMKB-C, GO-C, KKC & COL) - The additional, extended or more accessible lending and guarantee schemes for small and medium-sized businesses, start-ups and scale-ups introduced by the first emergency package will continue. The Corona Bridge Loan (COL) programme, designed to improve the liquidity position of innovative companies (start-ups and scale-ups) that do not benefit from bank financing, will receive a second injection of EUR 150 million due to the large number of applications received.

8 May
The Dutch government introduces a new measure aimed at providing bridge-loans to SME's in urgent need of liquidity. The Small Credits Corona scheme (Klein Krediet Corona or KKC) was adopted on the initiative of the banks with the backing of the government. Under this scheme, the government will provide a 95% guarantee on bridge loans between EUR 10.000 – 50.000, up to a total of EUR 750 million. To qualify, the company must have been registered with the chamber of commerce before 1 January 2020, have a turnover of over EUR 50.000 and have been sufficiently profitable before the coronacrisis. A bridge-loan with a guarantee under the KKC scheme can be applied for through the company's financier. All financiers accredited to grant BMKB-C loans automatically also are accredited to grant KKC loans.


24 April
The European Commission approves the EUR 100 million Dutch State Aid scheme, known as the Corona Bridge Loan (Corona Overbruggingslening or COL) programme, which provides bridge loans to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that do not benefit from bank financing. Due to the outbreak of COVID-19, many companies that were previously financed through private equity or venture capital are now in need of a bridge loan, while banks are primarily focused on their existing clients. Under this new scheme, the government will provide funding to non-bank-financed companies through the Regional Development Agencies in the Netherlands. The maximum loan under the scheme is capped at EUR 2 million and, in any event, may not exceed the company’s liquidity needs at the time of grant for the next 18 months. For loans above EUR 250,000, the company’s shareholders should co-finance at least 25% of the loan amount. This measure was first announced by the Dutch government on 7 April.


24 April
The European Commission approves the EUR 100 million Dutch State Aid scheme to provide bridge loans to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that do not benefit from bank financing. Due to the outbreak of COVID-19, many companies that were previously financed through private equity or venture capital are now in need of a bridge loan, while banks are primarily focused on their existing clients. Under this new scheme, the government will provide funding to non-bank-financed companies through the Regional Development Agencies in the Netherlands. The maximum loan under the scheme is capped at EUR 2 million and, in any event, may not exceed the company’s liquidity needs at the time of grant for the next 18 months. For loans above EUR 250,000, the company’s shareholders should co-finance at least 25% of the loan amount. This measure was first announced by the Dutch government on 7 April.


22 April
The European Commission approves the expansion of the GO programme announced by the Dutch government on 7 April (GO-C). The specific coronavirus clause in the programme covers loans granted by banks as from 24 March 2020. The Dutch State will guarantee 90% of new loans to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and 80% of new loans to large enterprises. Banks are obliged to grant a 6-month moratorium on loan repayments to borrowers before they can invoke the State guarantees on loans provided under the scheme. The agricultural, fisheries and aquacultural sectors are – contrarily to the general GO scheme – eligible to receive a loan under the GO-C clause.


15 April
The Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality (Landbouw, Natuur en Voedselkwaliteit) announces that it will compensate the ornamental horticulture sector, specific segments of the food horticulture sector, and the potato sector for losses suffered as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. From one day to the next, many companies in these sectors experienced an acute drop in demand due to the disappearance of their export market and the loss of their largest domestic market, the hotel and catering industry.

For the ornamental horticulture sector and specific segments of the food horticulture sector, there will be a EUR 600 million compensation scheme. Potato growers will be compensated based on the volume of deep-frozen potatoes they have in storage. The compensation is intended to cover potatoes that can no longer be processed into chips this season and amounts to 40% of the average market value for the period from September 2019 to February 2020. A total of 50 million euros will be made available for this purpose.


9 April
The Commission consults with Member States on further expansion of the Temporary Framework. The Commission now proposes further extending the scope of the Temporary Framework to enable Member States to provide recapitalisation to companies in need. Since such public intervention could have a significant impact on competition in the Single Market, these measures should be used as a last resort. Moreover, they will be subject to clear conditions as regards the Member State's compensation and entry to and exit from the companies concerned, strict governance provisions, and appropriate measures to limit potential distortions of competition.


7 April
The Dutch government announces additional aid measures. 

  • The previously expanded GO programme for state-backed loans to large companies will be further extended, introducing a coronavirus-specific clause (Go-C), to guarantee up to 80% of loans for large companies and 90% for SMEs (with turnover of up to EUR 50 million). The guarantee ceiling was previously 50%. The Dutch government intends to provide guarantees of up to EUR 10 billion in total, up from EUR 1.5 billion. This measure is under notification with the European Commission.
  • The government is setting up a fund to provide bridge loans to non-bank-financed companies. Due to the outbreak of COVID-19, many companies that were previously financed through private equity or venture capital are now in need of a bridge loan, while banks are primarily focused on their existing clients. Since it is difficult for these types of companies to obtain financing, the government is stepping in by providing funding through the Regional Development Agencies. The government has made available a first tranche of EUR 100 million for this purpose. This measure is under notification with the European Commission.
  • The premium charged for a BMKB guarantee under the Corona-expansion is lowered from 3.9% to 2%, taking into account the rules on State Aid. The financing of SMEs through the BMKB programme will be made easier for non-bank financiers, which can now be accredited using an expedited procedure. The Dutch government intends to provide guarantees of up to EUR 1.5 billion in total under the BMKB programme (up from EUR 765 million).
  • The Dutch government has announced that it is working on a reinsurance scheme for credit insurance. The current crisis forces credit insurance companies to lower credit or withdraw it altogether. This leads to the economy grinding to halt, since companies will no longer be able to supply their purchasers with products. The state guarantee is estimated at EUR 12 billion.

6 April
The Emergency Bridge Fund for Employment is implemented. Companies can now request assistance through the portal on the website of the Employee Insurance Agency (UWV). 


3 April
The European Commission approves a €23 million Dutch scheme to support certain providers of home-based social assistance and healthcare services during the coronavirus outbreak. The aid takes the form of direct grants for the purchase, lease, license and implementation of e-health applications.


3 April
The European Commission extends the Temporary Framework to enable Member States to accelerate research, testing and production of coronavirus-relevant products, to protect jobs and to further support the economy during the coronavirus outbreak. The five additional types of measures are:
(i)    More support for coronavirus-related research and development: The Commission wishes to incentivize funding to address the current health crisis.
(ii)    More support for the construction and upgrading of testing facilities; 
(iii)   More support for the production of products relevant to tackle the coronavirus outbreak: Governments can provide incentives for companies to invest in testing facilities for products relevant to tackling the coronavirus outbreak, such as vaccines, medical equipment or devices, protective material and disinfectants. Support can include a no-loss guarantee.
(iv)    Targeted support in the form of a deferral of tax payments and/or suspension of employer's social security contributions; and
(v)    Targeted support in the form of wage subsidies for employees: The purpose of such subsidies is to avoid lay-offs due to the coronavirus crisis in the specific regions or sectors hardest hit by the outbreak.

The Temporary Framework is also updated to expand the possibilities of direct support to a company of up to EUR 800,000 through zero-interest loans, guarantees on loans covering 100% of the risk, and the provision of equity.


2 April 
The European Commission introduces SURE: Europe-supported short-time work. Under SURE, the Commission will provide loans to Member States to strengthen their short-time work schemes. SURE will provide up to €100 billion in loans to countries that need them in order to ensure that workers receive income and businesses keep their staff. All Member States will be able to make use of this scheme, but it will be of particular importance to those hardest hit.


2 April
The European Commission introduces the Coronavirus Response Initiative Plus (CRII+). This package complements CRII by introducing extraordinary flexibility to allow non-utilised support from the European Structural and Investment Funds to be mobilised to the fullest. Flexibility is enhanced through: transfer possibilities across the three cohesion policy funds (the European Regional Development Fund, European Social Fund and Cohesion Fund), transfers between the various categories of regions, and more options when it comes to thematic concentration. There will also be the possibility for a 100% EU co-financing rate for cohesion policy programmes for accounting year 2020-2021, allowing Member States to benefit from full EU financing for crisis-related measures. CRII+ also simplifies the procedural steps linked to programme implementation and the use of financial instruments and audit.


27 March
The European Commission has decided to temporarily remove all countries from the list of “marketable risk" countries under the Short-term export-credit insurance Communication. The amendment to the Annex to the Short-term export-credit insurance Communication further expands the flexibility on how to demonstrate that certain countries were not-marketable provided in the Temporary Framework of 19 March.

Go to the most recent update


1.    European Commission's Temporary State Aid Framework

On 19 March, the Commission adopted a temporary State Aid framework (the "Temporary Framework") to enable Member States to support their economies during the COVID-19 outbreak. The Temporary Framework recognizes that the EU economy as a whole is experiencing a "serious disturbance" which justifies an exemption under the State Aid rules. The main goal of the Temporary Framework is to ensure that sufficient liquidity remains available to companies.

The Temporary Framework provides for five types of aid:

(i)    Direct grants, selective tax advantages and advance payments: Member States can set up schemes to grant up to EUR 800,000 per company to address urgent liquidity needs.
(ii)    State guarantees for bank loans to companies: Member States can provide state-backed guarantees at favourable rates to ensure that banks continue to extend loans to corporate customers that need them. The guarantees may cover both investment and working capital loans.
(iii)    Subsidised public loans to companies: Member States can grant loans at subsidised interest rates to companies to cover immediate working capital and investment needs.
(iv)    Safeguards for banks used to channel State aid to the economy: When banks are used to channel financial support to businesses, such aid is considered direct aid to the banks' customers, not to the banks themselves. The Temporary Framework provides guidance on how to ensure minimal distortion of competition between banks.
(v)    Short-term export credit insurance: The Temporary Framework introduces additional flexibility on how to demonstrate that certain countries are not-marketable risks, thereby enabling short-term export credit insurance to be provided by the government, where needed. The Commission has temporarily removed all countries from the list of "marketable risk" countries under the Short-term Export Credit Communication.

The aid measures mentioned under point (i) may be combined with those described under points (ii), (iii) or (v). However, subsidised public loans (iii) and State guarantees (ii) are mutually exclusive.

The Temporary Framework supplements the many other possibilities already available to Member States under the existing EU State Aid rules. The Temporary Framework will be in place until the end of 2020, with the possibility of an extension should this prove necessary. The full text of the Temporary Framework as well as the requirements state aid measures must meet in order to fall under the framework can be found here.

On 27 March, the European Commission announced that it had sent to the Member States a draft proposal to further extend the Temporary Framework, with additional support possibilities for the five types of aid measures mentioned above. The Commission aims to have the amended Temporary Framework in place this week. The extension is intended to provide targeted support to save jobs in sectors and regions that are particularly hard hit by the outbreak. 

The five additional proposed types of measures are:
(i)    More support for coronavirus-related research and development: The Commission wishes to incentivize funding to address the current health crisis.
(ii)    More support for the construction and upgrading of testing facilities
(iii)   More support for the production of products relevant to tackle the coronavirus outbreak: Governments can provide incentives for companies to invest in testing facilities for products relevant to tackling the coronavirus outbreak, such as vaccines, medical equipment or devices, protective material and disinfectants. Support can include a no-loss guarantee.
(iv)   Targeted support in the form of a deferral of tax payments and/or suspensions of employer's social security contributions; and
(v)   Targeted support in the form of wage subsidies for employees: The purpose of such subsidies is to help avoid lay-offs due to the coronavirus crisis in the specific regions or sectors hardest hit by the outbreak.

Measures (i) through (iii) will be available for cross-border cooperation between Member States.

2.    Dutch Emergency Package for Jobs and the Economy  

On 27 March, the Dutch government released more information about the Dutch measures to help businesses stay afloat during the COVID-19 crisis. An estimated ten to twenty billion euros will be injected into the economy in the coming quarter through what is described as the Emergency Package for Jobs and the Economy.

  • All qualifying undertakings in the hardest-hit sectors, such as the hospitality sector and the travel industry, will receive fixed one-time compensation of EUR 4,000 for a period of three months. Effective 30 March, the list of qualifying undertakings has been extended to include additional sectors adversely affected by the government's measures to contain the spread of COVID-19.
  • The government has replaced the existing reduction in working time scheme (werktijdverkorting) with the Emergency Bridge Fund for Employment. Pursuant to this measure, Employee Insurance Agency (UWV) will cover up to 90% of the employer's salary cost, depending on the decrease in aggregate turnover of the group (20% minimum). To qualify for assistance, employers must guarantee that there will be no involuntary redundancies during a given period and that salaries will continue to be paid. The fund is currently still in the implementation stage.
  • The Dutch government has extended measures for all companies through which undertakings can borrow money at favourable rates. This expands the scope of the BMKB (Borgstelling MKB-kredieten) programme for SMEs and the GO programme (Garantie Ondernemingsfinanciering) for larger companies. 
  • All companies will be able to request a three-month deferral of their tax obligations, at significantly lower interest rates and with a temporary waiver of the penalties for late payment. Furthermore, companies can request that their provisional tax assessment be lowered.
  • Finally, the Dutch government has pledged to provide all necessary financing to keep the healthcare system up and running, in order to allow hospitals, doctors, nurses and all others on the frontline to continue their indispensable work and valiant efforts in the fight against COVID-19.

3.    State Aid in the event of exceptional occurrences

The current State Aid framework provides for an exemption for measures that aim to remedy a serious disturbance in the economy. The European Commission has established that the situation with respect to COVID-19 qualifies as such a 'serious disturbance'. 

The current framework also allows Member States to take State Aid measures to make good damage caused by natural disasters or exceptional occurrences. Accordingly, if the Dutch government decides to provide relief to businesses suffering from the COVID-19 crisis, it is likely that such measures would be classified as falling under one of these exemptions. 

The mere fact that a State Aid measure is covered by an exemption, however, does not mean that the European Commission need not be notified. Before a government can grant financial relief, the individual measure or the scheme must be submitted to and approved by the European Commission.

4.    Expedited notification procedure

For State Aid measures requiring notification, the Commission has set up a special mailbox and telephone number which Member States can use to discuss their plans. In addition, the notification procedure for State Aid has been significantly expedited. For example, a Danish government proposal to compensate a large-scale events organiser for the cancellation of several events was approved within 24 hours. Competition Commissioner Vestager has stated that the Commission will work just as quickly with any Member State that wishes to implement arrangements to compensate businesses for damage caused by COVID-19. 

5.    Freeing up funding: Corona Response Investment Initiative

In order to be able to incentivise their economies, Member States will need funding. Given the limited size of the EU budget, the European Commission has indicated that the main response will need to come from national budgets. On 26 March, the European Parliament accepted a proposal by the Commission to set up the Corona Response Investment Initiative, which directs EUR 37 billion towards healthcare systems, SMEs, labour markets and other vulnerable parts of Member State economies. These funds are to be made available through the relinquishment by the Commission this year of its obligation to request the repayment of pre-financing for structural funds, with an additional EUR 8 billion from the EU budget.

The European Parliament has also accepted a proposal allowing Member States to use the EU Solidarity Fund for public health emergencies. This will make an additional EUR 800 million available to Member States in 2020.

The relief measures financed (partially) by these funds will be implemented by the Member State governments through State Aid programmes, which can be set up quickly thanks to the abovementioned fast-track approval procedure.

Would you like to keep up to date with our publications regarding COVID-19? Register here. We will send you a weekly update with the latest articles.

Cookie notice

Our website only uses cookies when you play video content. Video content is streamed from YouTube, YouTube is a Google service. Our website does not use tracking cookies and/or third party cookies when you do not play video content. Please read the privacy/cookie policy for more information.